Sugar on Snow | Maple Toffee

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It doesn’t snow very often in Arkansas but when it does I look forward to making Sugar on Snow! This sweet treat is common across New England and is the perfect treat after a long day of making maple syrup or a fun day of playing in the snow.

Most of Arkansas is shut down this morning following a winter storm that came through last night. We got several inches of beautiful snow at our house last night! When it does snow here in Arkansas, it is always a pretty big deal and I can count on at least several posts about Snow Cream to pop up in my social media feeds.

Snow Cream is an ice cream-like dessert made by mixing fresh snow with either condensed milk or a combination of sugar and milk until it reaches a creamy consistency. Snow Cream is good, but where I come from (Vermont), we made Sugar on Snow and in my opinion, Sugar on Snow is far superior to Snow Cream.

Sugar on Snow, also called Maple Toffee, is a delicious candy treat made by pouring boiling syrup onto fresh snow. The result is delicious, mapley goodness that is sweet and satisfying.

maple toffee or sugar on snow can be eaten with a fork

The key is to use REAL Maple Syrup. Not that fake imposter! Of course, Vermont Maple Syrup is most decidedly the best. (Did you know my family used to make Maple Syrup?)

During sugaring season in Vermont, it is not uncommon for local sugar shacks (places that make maple syrup) to throw sugar on snow parties. Everyone enjoys watching the syrup being made and while the thick sweet steam hangs in the air, the boiling syrup is poured across pans of fresh snow. As the boiling syrup hits the ice-cold snow it crystallizes and becomes like candy. It starts off soft and chewy and becomes hard as it cools. Sugar on snow is typically served with donuts, pickles (a little sour to cut the sweet), and hot strong coffee.

Sugar on Snow – Maple Toffee

Ingredients

  • Maple Syrup (The REAL stuff, please. Sorry, Jack and Jemimah)
  • Fresh Snow

Directions

  1. Fill several bowls (one per person) with fresh snow. You want the snow to be about 2 inches deep in the bowl for the best results. Fill the bowl well, but don’t “pack” the snow. Leave these bowls outside while you prepare the rest of the recipe.preparing fresh snow for sugar on snow
  2. In a large pot bring maple syrup to a boil. You will probably need about 1/4 cup of syrup per person but you want the pot to be much larger than you think. Maple syrup bubbles A LOT when it boils and boil overs are a risk. Watch the pot carefully! Use a candy thermometer and bring the syrup to 234˚. Boil at this temperature for several minutes but do not stir the syrup. You are bringing the syrup just short of the maple sugar stage and stirring can cause crystals to begin forming.boiling maple syrup for sugar on snow
    Once the syrup has boiled, quickly carry it outside and drizzle it over the bowls of fresh snow. You want to spread it around so it comes into contact with lots of snow. Pouring it all in one spot will spoil the reaction.pouring boiling maple syrup onto fresh snow
  3. The Sugar on Snow can be eaten with a fork. Once it completely hardens, just pick it up and eat it like candy.syrup hardens onto snow to create a sticky maple toffee candy

Notes: You will need a candy thermometer. It is also best to boil your syrup outdoors, if possible. This is a perfect recipe for a winter camping trip.

Are you a Snow Cream family or a Sugar on Snow family?

Read Next

Here is the printable Sugar on Snow recipe.

maple toffee or sugar on snow can be eaten with a fork

Sugar on Snow - Maple Toffee

Sugar on Snow, also called Maple Toffee, is a delicious candy treat made by pouring boiling syrup onto fresh snow. The result is delicious, mapley goodness that is sweet and satisfying.

Equipment

  • Candy Thermometer

Ingredients
  

  • Maple Syrup The REAL stuff, please. Sorry, Jack and Jemimah
  • Fresh Snow

Instructions
 

  • Fill several bowls (one per person) with fresh snow. You want the snow to be about 2 inches deep in the bowl for the best results. Fill the bowl well, but don't "pack" the snow. Leave these bowls outside while you prepare the rest of the recipe.
  • In a large pot bring maple syrup to a boil. You will probably need about 1/4 cup of syrup per person but you want the pot to be much larger than you think. Maple syrup bubbles A LOT when it boils and boil overs are a risk. Watch the pot carefully! Use a candy thermometer and bring the syrup to 234˚. Boil at this temperature for several minutes but do not stir the syrup. You are bringing the syrup just short of the maple sugar stage and stirring can cause crystals to begin forming. Once the syrup has boiled, quickly carry it outside and drizzle it over the bowls of fresh snow. You want to spread it around so it comes into contact with lots of snow. Pouring it all in one spot will spoil the reaction.
  • The Sugar on Snow can be eaten with a fork. Once it completely hardens, just pick it up and eat it like candy.

Notes

Notes: You will need a candy thermometer. It is also best to boil your syrup outdoors, if possible. This is a perfect recipe for a winter camping trip.

Pin this Sugar on Snow recipe to Pinterest to save it for later.

Sugar on Snow, also called Maple Toffee, is a delicious candy treat made by pouring boiling syrup onto fresh snow. The result is delicious, mapley goodness that is sweet and satisfying.

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